The St. Louis Area Business Health Coalition will host a virtual Manager Wellness Training on Thursday, February 22 at 9:00 am and again on Tuesday, April 9 at 2:00 pm. This training will help prepare managers with a crash course specifically developed for workplace well-being.

Each session will last 45 minutes and is free through the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. In this training, managers will:

  • Understand the business case for workplace wellness, including its impact on health care costs, productivity, and employee morale.
  • Learn the basic structure of a workplace wellness program, including current best practices.
  • Leave with the necessary tools and resources to engage their employees in a wellness program.

To register for the February training, click here. Reserve your spot for the April session here.

Reference:

Annie Turner, Director of Member Engagement & Health Solutions
St. Louis Area Business Health Coalition
aturner@stlbhc.org

The Joplin Health Department will hold an Immunization Clinic for incoming ninth and twelfth graders at Joplin High School during their school open house on Thursday, August 17, 2023.

From 4:30 to 6:30 pm, TDAP and Meningococcal Conjugate vaccinations will be available. If your student needs either of these vaccinations, please fill out an online consent form here, on the Joplin Schools’ Facebook page, or pick up a paper copy at the Joplin High School Nurse’s Office. Forms should be completed and returned to the Nurse’s Office by Wednesday, June 28, 2023.

Consent forms can be faxed to Attention: Nurse at 417.625.5238. If you have questions, please contact the Joplin High School Nurse’s Office at 417.625.5200, ext. 3013 or 3026.

Employee engagement is defined by Gallup as “the involvement and enthusiasm of employees in their work and workplace.” Only 15% of workers worldwide and 35% in the U.S. report to falling in the “engaged” category. Employee engagement is critical for organizations to thrive. Engaged employees are in it for more than just a paycheck; they care about their work and the performance of the company.

Why is employee engagement important?

High employee engagement is beneficial to the success of a company. The main benefit is lower employee turnover, because employees who aren’t engaged in their work are more likely to start looking for something new and more fulfilling. When employees are engaged in their work, there will be decreased burnout and increased productivity.

So how do we improve employee engagement?

Communication is a critical factor for high levels of employee engagement. Employees want to feel heard. This means allowing them to be open, honest, and able to make improvements for the good of the company and its employees. Employees want to be informed. In larger companies, someone is almost always out of the loop. Consider investing in ways to keep employees informed so they can feel invested in the company.

Employees want to be known for what they’re good at and rewarded as well. Offering employees recognition and promotions for their  work is a great way to encourage employee engagement. When an employee is given recognition for their performance, they will likely continue and become more engaged in their work. When their achievements are overlooked, they are more likely to become disengaged.

Management plays a key role in employee engagement. Having meaningful conversations with employees about work expectations and how they are meeting those expectations can highly improve engagement. One-on-one meetings are crucial to making connections with employees and identifying their motivators. Meeting regularly will help build trust, while helping employees meet their goals.

Prioritizing and working to improve employee engagement can tremendously help your organization’s success.

Submitted by Kaitlyn Collins
MSSU Health Promotions and Wellness Intern

Practicing self-care is essential to our mental well-being. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, self-care can help manage stress, lower the risk of illness, and increase energy levels. Self-care comes in all different forms and looks different for everyone. To create your own self-care plan, you need to determine your stressors and tailor your plan to what might alleviate the stress.

Practice Gratitude

Reminding yourself each day of all the things you are thankful for is a great way to reduce stress. Write them in a journal and when you are feeling down, read the entries to be reminded of your blessings.

Prioritize Physical Health 

When your body feels better, your mind will feel better. This includes making sure you’re getting enough exercise, eating a balanced diet, staying hydrated, and getting enough sleep. Exercise doesn’t have to be strenuous, for some it might be walking 20-30 minutes a day. With sleep, it is a good practice to stick to a schedule and not have any blue light exposure from a phone or computer for at least 30 minutes before going to bed. The CDC recommends at least seven hours of sleep for adults.

Set Goals

Having a to-do list for the day is a great way to feel accomplished and contribute to mental well-being. Start out with little things you know you can accomplish and work up to bigger things. Being able to check something off a list can give you a great sense of accomplishment. Always focus on what you have completed during the day and not what you were unable to complete.

Take Time for Yourself

Set aside time at least once a week to do something that is just for you. Maybe that’s going on a walk to clear your head, reading your favorite book, or going to your favorite store. You should be your top priority because prioritizing yourself will do wonders for your mental well-being. 

Start by picking one self-care practice and go from there. Once you get started, you won’t want to stop!

 

Reference

Kaitlyn Collins, Health Promotions and Wellness Intern
Missouri Southern State University

Freeman Health System is pleased to host the Work@Health Certification Training by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on March 30 and 31, 2023.

The training is made possible by the St. Louis Area Business Health Coalition and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services and is supported by the Missouri Council for Activity and Nutrition (MOCAN) Worksite Workgroup.

The training is designed to enhance employer knowledge of strategies and tools for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of workplace health interventions. The science-based curriculum includes eight core modules that provide employers with the skills to implement a comprehensive worksite wellness program using interventions that principally address chronic health conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and obesity. Lunch is included on the first day and breakfast will be offered on the second.

For questions, please contact Annie Fitzgerald at afitzgerald@stlbhc.org.

 

Freeman Health System is pleased to host the Work@Health Certification Training by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on March 30 and 31, 2023.

The training is made possible by the St. Louis Area Business Health Coalition and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services and is supported by the Missouri Council for Activity and Nutrition (MOCAN) Worksite Workgroup.

The training is designed to enhance employer knowledge of strategies and tools for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of workplace health interventions. The science-based curriculum includes eight core modules that provide employers with the skills to implement a comprehensive worksite wellness program using interventions that principally address chronic health conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and obesity. Lunch is included on the first day and breakfast will be offered on the second.

For questions, please contact Annie Fitzgerald at afitzgerald@stlbhc.org.

 

(Joplin, MO) – Caregivers help patients with care that can range from dressing and bathing to meal prep, transportation to doctor appointments and social activities. This care can take a toll on the caregiver both mentally and physically. According to the Family Caregiver’s Alliance, 25% of male caregivers and 35% of female caregivers report high stress due to caregiving. Exercise provides an outlet for stress and offers relief and relaxation.

Personal trainer Karen King, of the Joplin Family YMCA, will share advice for caregivers at the Freeman Caregiver Support Group meeting July 14. King will explain what caregivers can do to ensure fitness and nutrition for their loved ones and themselves. She will explain opportunities available at the YMCA, as well as provide tips to be successful.

Facilitated by Ozark Center Assistant Director of Adult Outpatient Services Jennifer Berry, MSW, LCSW, the support group meets from 10:30 am to 12:00 pm at the Freeman Business Center conference rooms. Guests should enter from the rear parking lot. Physical distancing and mask wearing will be practiced. Refreshments and door prizes are provided.

Please RSVP to Kathy Mason at kdmason@freemanhealth.com or call 417.347.8463.

Reference:

Kathy Mason, Freeman Community Health Worker
Freeman Health System
417.347.8463
kdmason@freemanhealth.com

Written by Amber Allen, Field Specialist in Human Development & Family Science, MU Extension

It is natural to feel stress in our lives. Our lives are busy with kids, jobs, caring for ill parents, and taking care of ourselves. A study by the American Physiological Society found that people are more likely to have higher stress hormones in the summer than in the winter. As you enjoy nicer weather and more outdoor activities, make sure to be proactive in your overall mental well-being.

Here are some tips to check in with your overall mental well-being throughout the summer:

  • To help your emotional well-being, practice coping skills, set healthy boundaries, and try different self-care techniques.
  • Develop a sense of connection and establish a support system. Join groups that are focused on a favorite activity or hobby.
  • Find ways to expand your knowledge and skills through intellectually stimulating activities.
  • Become aware of your stress symptoms and identify and clarify your stressors.

It is important to know everyone handles stress differently. If you are interested in learning more on how you handle stress check out the upcoming Taking Care of You classes that MU Extension is providing. Learn more here.

About the MU Extension: 

University of Missouri Extension programs focus on the high-priority needs of Missourians to improve lives, communities and economies by providing relevant, responsive and reliable educational solutions. MU Extension programs are open to all

(Joplin, MO) – Dementia is the impaired ability to remember, think or make decisions to the extent that it interferes with everyday activities. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia, and neither is a normal part of aging.

Alzheimer’s accounts for 60% – 80% of dementia cases and while the greatest known risk factor is aging, it can also affect people under the age of 65, which is known as early-onset Alzheimer’s. Understanding the stages of dementia and Alzheimer’s will be the focus of this month’s Freeman Caregiver Support Group with a special presentation by College View Manor’s Carey Prater, who serves as the Chair of the Joplin Area Walk to End Alzheimer’s. Prater will explain how to navigate essential care needs for loved ones with dementia or Alzheimer’s at the meeting on Thursday, May 26.

Facilitated by Ozark Center Assistant Director of Adult Outpatient Services Jennifer Berry, MSW, LCSW, the support group meets from 10:30 am to 12:00 pm at the Freeman Business Center conference rooms. Guests should enter from the rear parking lot. Physical distancing and mask wearing will be practiced. Refreshments and door prizes are provided.

Please RSVP to Kathy Mason at kdmason@freemanhealth.com or call 417.347.8463.

Having a healthy environment in the workplace is essential for employers and employees to be successful and productive. In a healthy workplace, you may find employees have higher job satisfaction and feel less stressed.

An unhealthy workplace can lead to job burnout – a state of emotional, mental, and sometimes physical exhaustion caused by prolonged stress. Employees and employers may feel overwhelmed and dissatisfied with their job. Burnout can cause physical fatigue and unwanted stress. Focusing on your emotional, mental and physical health can help you fight feelings of burnout, which in turn will help you be more productive, fell less stressed, and create a healthier work environment.

By focusing on mental, physical, and emotional health, you can create a culture that thrives with employees who are productive and satisfied with their work. Mental health in the workplace is important for everyone because when it is a priority everyone feels safe. For most employees, better mental health and a healthy workplace means creating a work-life balance. Although employers cannot control what goes on outside of work, they can try to create a space where employees feel safe and enjoy coming to work.
Here are some ideas on how to create a healthy workspace:

• Offer resources to mental health benefits: Start an employee assistance program. Provide resources for counseling sessions and/or telehealth visits for mental health.

• Promote setting boundaries: Encourage time management and give employees so they can establish and maintain regular work day hours.

• Support wellness activities: Create a wellness program and encourage physical activity. Start walking groups or team yoga sessions. Keep sleep logs. Have group or personal meditation.

These are only some of the ideas that employers can establish in their workplace . They lessen the risk of job burnout and keep employees coming back to work. By prioritizing mental, physical, and emotional health, you will find that employees come to work happier, less stressed and more productive.

Submitted by Abbie Casper, MSSU Health Promotion and Wellness Intern
Reviewed by Kris Drake RN, CHPD Freeman Health System Wellness Coordinator

https://www.webmdhealthservices.com/blog/ways-to-improve-mental-health-in-the-workplace/
https://www.welcoa.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/WELCOA-Pulse-Resource-Update-090921.pdf
https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/burnout/art-20046642