One person giving a pint of blood can save as many as three lives. In fact, someone just like you donated the blood Sid McConnell needed to recover from a quadruple bypass, giving him the chance to have more adventures with his daughters.

Currently blood usage is up while donations are down due to cancelled blood drives. Freeman Health System hopes to help by holding a blood drive with Community Blood Center of the Ozarks (CBCO) on Tuesday, March 22.

CBCO is the sole provider of blood and plasma products to Freeman, as well as more than 44 other hospitals in its 40-county service area. Many patients depend on blood transfusions, and Freeman Health System uses more than 500 pints of blood each month.

Giving blood is a safe, easy way to ensure our friends, family and neighbors will have the lifesaving blood they need. Donors 17 or older who weigh at least 110 pounds and have not given blood in the past eight weeks are encouraged to participate. Donors will receive a free quarter-zip pullover while supplies last.

Please eat well and drink plenty of water before your appointment. Photo identification is required. CBCO follows current CDC guidelines regarding masks. CBCO follows current CDC guidelines regarding masks.

Appointments are strongly encouraged to manage donor flow. To schedule your appointment, call 417.227.5006 or you can go to cbco.org/donate-blood.

What: Freeman Blood Drive

When: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm, Tuesday, March 22

Where: Freeman Hospital West, Conference Rooms 1W – 4W

Health is a lot more than how one looks and feels. Conversations about health should include all eight dimensions or areas of wellness—that is mental, social, emotional, spiritual, financial, occupational, environmental, and intellectual. That’s the focus of Living Well Month, a national event in March promoting overall wellness and the education provided by Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) professionals to improve the lives of people, families, and communities.

“The Missouri Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences works through the University of Missouri Extension Service to offer information that will help families achieve a positive, healthy lifestyle,” says Lindsey Stevenson, nutrition and health specialist in Barton, Jasper, and Dade Counties. “Whether you are trying to manage your diabetes through meal planning and exercise, make decisions about health care and insurance, or get tips on effective parenting techniques, Extension FCS has a research-based answer.

To make every month a “Living Well Month,” consider these tips:

1. Engage children in at least 60 minutes of physical activity on most days of the week. Adults need at least 30 minutes of physical activity. Play sports or recreational games, turn on some music and dance, hula hoop, or make an obstacle course. Take a walk or a bike ride in your neighborhood. All movement counts.

2. Start planning a garden now to work in the spring and summer. Gardening is great physical activity. This activity could also nurture your mental and environmental wellness.

3. Rethink your drink. The average adult human body is approximately 60 percent water. Water regulates every living cell’s process and chemical reactions. It transports nutrients and oxygen. Water also helps to maintain normal bowel habits and prevent constipation. Reduce the amount of soda and fruit drinks consumed daily.

4. Eat a variety of healthful foods. Eat colorful fruits and vegetables every day. Most people need to increase their fruit and vegetable intake. Have a sliced banana on cereal for breakfast. Enjoy a sandwich loaded with vegetables at lunch. At dinner, steam some vegetables and prepare a fruit parfait with yogurt for dessert. Try new fruits and vegetables. If there’s a kind you don’t like, try preparing it in a different way. See www.choosemyplate.gov for more information about nutrition for yourself and members of your family.

5. Read, read, read. Go to the library and check out books. Keep the mental stimulation flowing throughout the year regardless of your age. This will stimulate your intellectual health.

6. Talk to a friend or start a journal to get your thoughts and feelings off your chest. Staying in check with emotional health can be tough, but it’s important.

7. Check out parenting, finance, nutrition and/or food preparation classes offered by your Extension office. Scan the QR code for more information about upcoming offerings.

8. Maintain a healthy home. Check that your smoke detector is working correctly and test for the presence of Radon. Help manage allergies and/or asthma by cleaning and vacuuming regularly to reduce allergy triggers in the home. Avoid accidental poisonings by keeping medications locked up, and cleaning agents and other poisons out of reach of children.

9. Keep your family finances in check. Track your expenses and update your budget regularly. Eat at home often because meals outside of home usually cost more. Plan your menus and use coupons as a planning tool. Creating and sticking to a budget, along with paying of debt are great first steps to financial wellness.

All eight of the dimensions or areas of wellness are connected and support each other. Evaluate your overall wellness and take small steps to improve your health during Living Well Month and all year long.

March 2022 Living Well Calendar

***
Extension Family and Consumer Science professionals are part of a nationwide educational organization funded through the Land Grant University System and United States Department of Agriculture. Local Extension Family and Consumer Sciences professionals provide practical,
relevant, non-biased, research-based information.

Submitted by:
Lindsey Stevenson, County Engagement Specialist in nutrition and health
University of Missouri Extension
417.682.3579
stevensonlk@missouri.edu

As we say goodbye to 2021, many people create New Year’s resolutions to become healthier versions of themselves.

The average American spends one-third of their life at work, so what better place to promote wellness than in the workplace.

As you develop wellness programs in the workplace, consider a whole-person approach. The Wellness Council of America (WELCOA) reports that successful workplace wellness initiatives require supporting employees in fulfilling their needs in seven areas.

Read more here, https://www.freemanhealth.com/blog/how-to-create-a-culture-of-well-being-in-the-workplace

Submitted By:
Margaret “Kris” Drake, RN, CHPD
Freeman Wellness Coordinator
mcdrake@freemanhealth.com

November marks Lung Cancer Awareness Month –a time to raise awareness of the need for more research, innovation and better community understanding of this disease.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. More patients die every year from the disease than from prostate, breast, and colon cancer combined.

More than 90% of people diagnosed with lung cancer do not survive in part because it is found at an advanced stage. Nodules are typically small, deep in the lungs and difficult to reach, making early-stage diagnosis and therapeutic applications difficult.

There are a variety of diagnostic options today for lung cancer, but all have limitations in cost, accuracy, safety or invasiveness. These limitations can lead to false positives, false negatives or side effects such as pneumothorax (collapsed lung) and hemorrhage, which can be serious complications and extend hospital stays.

Patients will now be able to reliably have a less invasive diagnostic procedure, which permits simultaneous tumor staging if necessary.

Facts About Lung Cancer:

  • Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide
  • More patients die every year from lung cancer than from prostate, breast, and colon cancer combined
  • The lung cancer five-year survival rate is only16.8%
  • Nearly 160,000 people die from lung cancer every year
  • 60% to 65% of all new lung cancer diagnoses are among people who have never smoked or are former smokers

At Freeman Health System, we are working to increase early detection, improve diagnostics, optimize treatment and accelerate recovery by providing our patients access to the most innovative technologies. The MONARCH® Platform, currently being used by Dr. Pierson, is a new robotic technology designed to transform the diagnosis of lung disease, with the goal of saving lives.

The Monarch Platform is designed to allow an accurate diagnosis without incisions from even the smallest and hardest-to-reach lung nodules –with the hope of catching lung conditions early. “At Freeman, we are excited to be among the first to offer this innovative technology, which uses the latest advances in robotics to diagnose lung conditions –with the least invasive approach for patients,” said Dr. Pierson, Pulmonologist. “Lung cancer doesn’t have to be a death sentence –we encourage the community to take an important step to be screened, so that we can find and treat lung cancer before it progresses.”  The MONARCH® Platform has potential to address the limitations of current bronchoscopy approaches by its ability to reach and access lesions that are located far out in the periphery of the lung, and by improved accuracy that comes from robotic technology.

Submitted By:
Grant Pierson, DO
Department of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine
Freeman Lung Institute

The term “epilepsy” derives from the Greek word meaning “to hold or seize.” Terminology and descriptions relating to seizures were first discovered in historic literature dating back to 2500 BC. Deciphered text corroborated a wide belief of the time period – that epilepsy was deemed a manifestation of evil spirits, demon possession, or some supernatural occurrence. For this reason, epilepsy carried a stigma for many centuries.

Today, 65 million people around the world have epilepsy and approximately 1 in 26 people in the U.S. will develop epilepsy at some point in their lifetime. Epilepsy is diagnosed after a person experiences two or more seizures that are not derived from another medical condition. These seizures are driven by disturbances in the brain’s electrical activity that may be provoked by brain injury, genetics, immune reactions, infections, or metabolic causes. Most often, however, the exact cause is unknown.

November is National Epilepsy Awareness Month. It is important to highlight how people live with epilepsy, a condition that can complicate everyday tasks such as cooking, driving, attending school, and even sleeping. The onset of a seizure can occur unexpectedly, in any location and during any activity. During a grand mal (generalized tonic-clonic) seizure, sudden falling can put a person at risk for head injury and tongue biting. On the other hand, a petit mal (absence) seizure can cause a person to blank out or stare into space for several seconds, even during a conversation. These most commonly affect children and can go undiagnosed, often with the child facing repercussions at school for daydreaming.

Adults may have a difficult time finding employment, face workplace discrimination, lose driving privileges, or feel a lack of independence. Children may be bullied or excluded from participating in sports. People with epilepsy live with these physical and emotional burdens on a daily basis and must take extra precautions compared to their peers. Raising awareness of these lifestyle differences can help foster more inclusive learning and working communities for people with epilepsy.

On the upside, advances in EEG, antiepileptic drugs, neuroimaging, and neurosurgery have radically improved the medical approach to diagnosing and treating epilepsy. Lastly, learning the basics of “Seizure First Aid” can enable bystanders to help in the event of a seizure. Follow these 3 steps, as outlined by the Epilepsy Foundation:

  1. Stay with the person until they are awake and alert. Time the seizure. Remain calm. Check for a medical ID.
  2.  Keep the person safe. Move them away from harm.
  3. Turn the person onto their side.

Call 911 if the seizure lasts longer than 5 minutes or if the person is injured, pregnant, sick, or has difficulty breathing. Do not attempt to restrain them or put any medications into their mouth. To learn more, visit epilepsy.com/firstaid.

Dr. Gulshan Uppal, MD

Elaine Lai

 

Dr. Uppal is a board-certified neurologist at Freeman NeuroSpine. If you have any questions about epilepsy, headaches, strokes, or other brain health concerns, you can contact Dr. Uppal at Freeman NeuroSpine, 1905 32nd St., Joplin, MO 64804, 417-347-7200.

References:

https://www.epilepsy.com/learn/about-epilepsy-basics/what-epilepsy

https://www.epilepsy.com/sites/core/files/atoms/files/SFA%20Flier_HQ_8.5x11_PDF.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7049807/pdf/EPI4-5-22.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3200035/

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/ert/2014/582039/

https://academic.oup.com/brain/article/137/9/2611/2848405

National Chiropractic Health Month in October is the perfect time to reflect on how chiropractic care improves your life. The event helps to raises public awareness of the importance of musculoskeletal health and the benefits of chiropractic care as well as its natural, whole-person, patient-centered and drug-free approach to health and wellness. Not sure how to observe this important month? Try a few of these suggestions.

Keep Moving

Stiff joints and tight muscles are more likely to be a problem if you don’t get enough exercise or spend too much time sitting. Fortunately, increasing your activity level is a simple way to avoid pain and stiffness. In fact, movement is so important that the American Chiropractic Association has made “Keep Moving” its theme for this year’s National Chiropractic Health Month.

Synovial fluid surrounding your joints decreases friction when you move helping joints move easily. The more you move, the more fluid circulates around your joints. Movement also helps nutrients reach your joints and muscles, reduces muscle stiffness and spasms, and makes it easier for your body to remove old, damaged cells from your joints.

Regular exercise keeps your bones strong and strengthens the muscles, ligaments, and tendons that support your joints. Although exercising in the gym is an excellent way to increase your activity level, you don’t need to participate in a formal workout program to enjoy the benefits of moving more. Walking, riding your bike, dancing, and gardening will keep your joints limber and strong.

Use Proper Lifting Techniques

According to the National Safety Council, the way you lift boxes and other heavy objects may increase your risk of a back injury, which is the second most common workplace injury. Poor lifting techniques stress the joints and muscles in your back, causing mild to severe pain.

Prevent injuries by following these steps when lifting:

  • Tighten your core to brace and prepare for the movement; maintain this bracing throughout the entire movement.
  • Hinge at your hips and bend your legs to keep your back straight when you lower your body to lift an object.
  • Keep the object close to your body when lifting.
  • Don’t twist your spine while carrying something heavy.
  • Bend your knees and slowly lower the object when you’re ready to put it down.

Even if you follow safe lifting techniques, you can still hurt your back if you lift something too heavy. Pick up a corner of the box or object first if you’re unsure of the weight. If the object feels very heavy, ask for help.

Embrace a Healthy Lifestyle

Eating healthy foods lowers your risk of developing serious conditions ranging from heart disease to diabetes and also helps you avoid joint issues. Making smart food choices ensures that your joints receive the nutrients needed to function efficiently and may help you heal faster if you do experience an injury.

Limit the number of processed foods you eat and add whole grains, fresh meat and poultry, fruits and vegetables, and healthy fats such as nuts to your diet. Not sure what to buy at the grocery store? Try shopping around the outside aisles of the store because that tends to be where most grocery stores keep the fresh and unprocessed foods.  Also, giving up smoking or heavy drinking will also help you protect your joints. 

See A Chiropractor

Visiting the chiropractor when you first notice pain, muscle spasms, or reduced range of motion can help you feel better faster. At Active Health Chiropractic, Dr. Jones offers many treatments designed to ease pain and mobility, including:

  • Spinal Manipulation (adjustments)
  • Acupuncture and Dry Needling
  • Cupping
  • Heat Therapies
  • Soft Tissue Manipulation and Mobilization
  • Ultrasound Therapy
  • Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) or Electrical Stimulation
  • Functional Movement Assessments

Chiropractic care in conjunction with your healthy lifestyle is a great recipe to keep you healthy and moving. If you are currently experiencing pain that is keeping you from doing the things that you love, scheduling an appointment for an exam can play a vital role in keeping moving. You can schedule an appointment by calling 417-365-3215 or online at https://www.acthealthchiro.com/.

Reference:
Austin R. Jones, DC
Active Health Chiropractic

Going hungry is detrimental to anyone’s well-being, but this is especially true for students as food insecurity can create a ripple effect that impacts their education, and therefore, their future.  

Food insecurity is the inability to buy healthy, nutritious meals or the inability to buy food altogether. In Joplin Schools, an estimated 400 elementary students and 400 middle and high school students are considered food insecure.  

“They can’t be certain they’ll have access to adequate nutrition outside of a school building,” says Sarah Coyne, coordinator of Bright Futures Joplin. “While more than 60% of Joplin students qualify for free and reduced lunches, these students are living in more than just economic deprivation. Their hunger impacts every area of their lives.”  

Studies from Feeding America, the Food Research & Action Center, and Hunger in the Ozarks have shown that food-insecure students are more likely to:  

  • Have trouble concentrating in school 
  • Frequently miss class, repeat a grade, or drop out of school 
  • Exhibit behavioral issues 
  • Suffer from impaired development and motor skills 
  • Lag behind their peers in reading and math 
  • Face illness or chronic health conditions  

“We know that hungry students focus less on learning and more on their empty bellies,” explains Coyne.  

This knowledge fuels a major part of Bright Futures’ mission. In 2010, the nonprofit began leveraging community resources to aid students in need. Today, they have over 70 affiliates nationwide who provide students with basic essentials, including school supplies, hygiene products, beds, clothing, and especially meals.  

This need for food created the Bright Futures Joplin Snack Pack program, which distributes take-home bags each Friday. The program ensures that students have enough to eat over weekends and holiday breaks.  

“Many local families struggle through seasons of economic insecurity,” says Coyne. “Knowing how prevalent these troubles are, it’s vital that we invest in our younger generations so they can grow into the future leaders, workers, and parents of Joplin.”  

This necessary investment, and the impacts of hunger, are not limited to younger students. The College & University Food Bank Alliance estimates that one in five college students face some form of food insecurity, but this issue is often overlooked or forgotten.  

“The focus is often on food insecurity in K-12 students,” says Dr. Andrea Cullers, Director of the Lion Co-Op at Missouri Southern State University (MSSU).  

Cullers knows that the concerns for a food-insecure K-12 student’s well-being are essentially the same for a food-insecure college student.  

“The same issues of focus, chronic stress, and decreased ability to learn also occur in college students who are food insecure,” she explains.  

Around 23% of MSSU students have been food insecure at some point within the last year. These students cannot function properly without adequate nutrition, and Cullers says their academics suffer. This is where the Lion Co-Op aims to help.  

Since 2018, the Lion Co-Op has served as the on-campus food pantry for students, employees, and Lion Cub Academy families. They offer pre-packaged dry goods, microwavable meals, and fresh groceries like milk, eggs, and yogurt. There is even a selection of toiletries and hygiene products.  

Before COVID-19, Cullers says that they saw around 50 students each week. In 2020, when they had to switch to an online ordering system, that number dropped by half. At the start of this school year, they returned to their previous in-store model and are seeing more and more students.  

“This semester, we are excited to reopen as a ‘grocery store,’ and our numbers are already rebounding,” she explains. “[We are] seeing around 30 students a week.”  

As they continue to grow, the Co-Op is looking forward to expanding their outreach. Cullers says they’ve already added food scholarships to local farmers markets, SNAP benefits assistance, and a snack bag program for Lion Cub Academy. They hope to do even more in the future.  

Similarly, Bright Futures is excited to see what this school year brings as they continue to support students in the community.  

“We are continually impressed by and proud of Joplin’s generosity and care for students in need of a helping hand,” concludes Coyne.  

Want to be that helping hand? Learn more about how you can help Bright Futures Joplin here and how you can assist the Lion Co-Op here 

Are you (like me) almost deaf to the words “childhood obesity”?  We have been hearing this term as an issue for many years now.  Unfortunately, hearing about it from so many sources has not made much of a difference.  Over the last several years, statistically, the problem has increased.  

In fact, over the last 18 months, during the COVID-19 pandemic, the levels of childhood obesity have greatly increased.  This is due to quarantine and increased stress, as well as other reasons.  The Freeman pediatric group noticed an increase in BMI in many of our patients during this time.  Many parents freely admit that they let the kids eat whatever they wanted and whenever they wanted.  Our patients were staying up later and sleeping in, and that drastically changed how much and what they consumed.  We also noted that this continued for children that did not go back to in-person school during the last school year.   

 It has become very clear that obesity is a major risk factor associated with worse COVID-19 health outcomes.  This is because obesity leaves the body in a constant state of inflammation.  Think of inflammation as a slow burning fire in your body, negatively affecting many of your organs.  An infection such as COVID is like a wind that stirs that fire into an inferno.   

As a pediatrician, it is part of my job to alert parents to abnormalities, diseases, or problems that they are likely to encounter with their children and give them sound advice.  However, it is very difficult to talk with families about obesity because there is such a negative and judgmental connotation to the word.  To avoid offense, we find different ways of saying the same thing, such as “your child is carrying a little too much weight.”  Parents will often deny that their child is obese or even think that they will outgrow the weight.  However, without some change in lifestyle-usually in what they consume-they will in fact carry this extra weight into adulthood.   

It is important to get something straight: OBESITY IS A DISEASE AND NOT A DECISIONNo one would choose to be overweight.  Furthermore, once your body has acquired the larger mass, it will do almost anything to hold on to it.  Therefore, it is extremely difficult to make a meaningful intervention.  As one might imagine, the earlier we intervene, the bigger the difference we can make in their future and the easier it is to make this an enduring habit. When we look at the data, we are able to predict these problems before age five.    

  The good news is that as of September 1, 2021, Missouri Medicaid has begun to pay for weight management treatment. Freeman pediatricians in Joplin are embarking on a project to aid a small number of local families with an evidence-based treatment that engages the whole family in behavior change. The bottom line is that this group of vulnerable people need our help as a community.  This includes increased access to nutritious low-calorie foods, free or low-cost enjoyable activities, and nutrition and wellness education.  We have formed a team that includes medical professionals, behavioral coaches, registered dietitians, and resource coordinators to help children with obesity, and their families, with the full range of support they need. Find out more information at https://www.freemanhealth.com/ryse. 

Dr. Paul Petry is Pediatric Medical Director at Freeman Health System in Joplin, Missouri 

A variety of health care organizations have come together to better understand the health status, behaviors and needs of the populations they serve. The Jasper and Newton Counties Community Health Collaborative, working with partners across the region, issued a Regional Health Assessment in 2019 to evaluate the health of our community and set a shared vision for action.

This group is now looking to update that assessment for 2022 and need your help.

Partners involved with this effort are asking for public feedback on local healthcare needs and experiences in the survey, which you can find here.

Questions are simple and are available in English and Spanish.

The group aims to use this systematic, data-driven assessment to inform decisions and guide efforts to improve community health and wellness.

Local Partners leading the work include Freeman Health System, Jasper County Health Department, Joplin Health Department, and Mercy Hospital Joplin.  The Springfield-Greene County Health Department has been instrumental in the organization of the project.

The resulting Regional Health Assessment will allow decision-makers to have a more holistic and up-to-date picture with which to strategically address community health concerns.

References:

Ryan Talken, Director
Joplin City Health Department
417.623.6122

Tony Moehr, Administrator
Jasper County Health Department
417.358.0480

This month’s update from Mercy Hospital Joplin includes:

  • Information on Pain Awareness Month in September
  • Spotlight on Mercy Clinics, featuring Mercy Clinic’s Pain Management
  • Onsite employer flu shot clinics
  • An update on COVID-19 vaccination boosters for immunocompromised individuals

September is Pain Awareness Month

Chronic pain from headaches, a back disorder, or other ailments don’t have to rule your life. If persistent pain interferes with your ability to be active, sleep, or enjoy time with family and friends, you can find help at Mercy.

We start by evaluating the source of your pain. Based on what we find, a team of experts will work together to develop a pain management plan that’s designed to meet your specific needs. As you go through your treatment program, we’ll keep your doctor in the loop about your progress.

Mercy’s specialists know how to help you manage chronic pain. We are experienced in treating conditions such as:

  • Post-surgical back pain
  • Sacroiliitis
  • Vertebral compression fractures
  • Complex regional pain syndrome
  • Post-amputation pain
  • Shingles and its complications

At Mercy, you’ll find that effective pain management also means we provide compassionate care. We listen to and address all your concerns — body, mind, and spirit — so you can heal completely. The sooner you move past your pain, the sooner you can return to a normal, active life.

Mercy Spotlight Clinic: Mercy Clinic Pain Management

Here to help serve our patients.

Mercy Clinic Pain Management — Carthage
3125 Dr. Russell Smith Way
Carthage, MO 64836
417.359.1829
www.mercy.net/practice/mercy-clinic-pain-management-carthage

Dr. Eugerie A. Hanley, M.D.
444 Four States Drive, Suite 1
Galena, KS 66739
877.783.4441
www.mercy.net/doctor/eugerie-a-hanley-md

Dr. Michael L. Hearndon, DO
444 Four States Drive, Suite 1A
Galena, KS 66739
877.783.4441
www.mercy.net/doctor/michael-l-hearndon-do

There are proven strategies and technologies for dealing with pain. At Mercy Clinic Pain Management, we know how to help. Our experienced team of medical specialists have successfully treated patients by helping them learn how pain changes their brain, body, and their life.

Get Your Flu Shot — Not the Flu!

Let Mercy Pharmacy come to your employer site to administer flu shots to employees in late September and October. This is the last chance for onsite flu shots!

Mercy can file your health insurance plan, pharmacy plan, or employer-paid billing.

Contact Angela Kennedy at 417.529.8495 or angela.kennedy@mercy.net for more information.

COVID-19 Vaccination Information

Mercy is now administering COVID-19 booster vaccinations for immunocompromised patients. It must have been at least 28 days since initial two-dose series. Mercy is only giving Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines at this time, so patients must have received Pfizer for the initial two-dose series.

Below are the CDC guidelines for the additional dose. Those that qualify can schedule online at mercy.net/covidvaccine or walk in the hospital clinic side, Wednesday through Friday from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm.

Who needs an additional COVID-19 vaccine?

Currently, the CDC is recommending that moderately to severely immunocompromised individuals receive an additional dose. This includes people who have:

  • Been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood.
  • Received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system.
  • Received a stem cell transplant within the last two years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system.
  • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome).
  • Advanced or untreated HIV infection.
  • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress your immune response.

People should talk to their health care provider about their medical condition and whether getting an additional dose is appropriate for them.

CDC does not recommend additional doses or booster shots for any other population at this time.

Mercy Directory

Need more information on Mercy divisions throughout southwest Missouri and southeast Kansas? See the Mercy directory here.

 

About Mercy: 

Mercy, named one of the top five large U.S. health systems for four consecutive years by IBM Watson Health, serves millions annually. Mercy is one of the nation’s most highly integrated, multi-state health care systems, including more than 40 acute care, managed and specialty (heart, children’s, orthopedic and rehab) hospitals, convenient urgent care locations, imaging centers and pharmacies. Mercy has 900 physician practices and outpatient facilities, more than 4,000 Mercy Clinic physicians and advanced practitioners and 40,000-plus co-workers serving patients and families across Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma. Mercy also has clinics, outpatient services and outreach ministries in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. In addition, Mercy’s IT division, Mercy Technology Services, and Mercy Virtual commercially serve providers and patients from coast to coast.

Reference:

Mercy Hospital Joplin
417-556-2728